‘Pink Sheets’ Are Safe – Judicial Service

ghana-supreme-courtThe Judicial Service has denied media reports that the National Security has demanded keys to the Supreme Court registry to guard the pink sheets and ensure no one tempers with them whiles steps are taken to audit them.

It therefore, assured the public that the sheets were safe at the registry and that the orders of the Supreme court that the Registrar took custody of the keys and secure the sheets could not be flouted.

There are media reports that the Supreme Court on Thursday rejected an offer by personnel of National Security, for the protection of the soon to be audited pink sheets.

It said further that the security personnel had demanded keys to the court registry to guard the sheets and ensure no one tempers with it while steps were being taken to audit it

A charge the national Security has denied.

Clarifying the issue further, the police in a statement said the Supreme court was not under siege as being suggested in a section of the public.

It said the police presence was on the orders or invitation of the judicial service with the security arrangements regulated by the Judicial Service and their security playing a front line role.

But the deputy Registrar of the Supreme Court, Mr Isaac Nkansah has told Graphic Online in a telephone interview that “that allegation is false.” adding that it would be prepostrous for anyone to think that the court can be pushed here and there.

The Communications Director at the Supreme court, Ms Grace Tagoe when contacted also told Graphic Online that “we are not aware of the demand by the national security. We don’t even know where the pink sheets are kept”.

Two policemen were seen on guard at the two entrance of the storey building leading to where the pinks sheets were allegedly kept while five more were seen taking over from those on the morning shift.

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Source: Graphic.com.gh

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